Porous Materials for Gas Storage and Separation

Two of the hottest areas in porous materials research in the last decade have been in energy storage, mainly hydrogen and methane, and in carbon capture and sequestration (CCS). Although these topics are intricately linked in terms of our future energy landscape, the specific materials needed to solve these problems must have significantly different properties. High pressure gas storage is most often linked with high surface areas and pore volumes, while carbon capture sorbents require high sorption enthalpies to achieve the needed selectivity. The latter typically involves separating CO2 from mixed gas streams of mostly nitrogen via a temperature swing adsorption (TSA) process. Much of the excitement has arisen because of the potential of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). This class of materials have extremely high surface areas (up to 10,000 m2/g) and can be modified to have specific physical properties, thus enabling high performance materials for targeted applications. Our research is focused on the synthesis and characterization of these novel materials for both applications by tuning framework topologies, composition, and surface properties.

Representative publications from Wriedt Laboratory:





Stimuli-Responsive Magnetic Materials

The interest in investigations on the synthesis of magnetic open-framework structures has increased because one of the most important advantages of such materials is the fact that the deintercalation, reintercalation, or exchange of the guest molecules in the host structure offers the opportunity to switch or even to modulate their magnetic properties in a desired way. Consequently, a few compounds were reported that show guest-sensitive spin-crossover, guest- modulated magnetic ordering temperatures, and guest-induced switching between different magnetic states. Among them, magnetic coordination materials have been prepared, in which paramagnetic transition metal ions are bridged by appropriate small-sized ligands, whose nature is one of the most important factors influencing their magnetic properties. In view of these considerations we started systematic investigation on magneto-structural correlations of a series of new metal-organic framework materials with guest-responsive magnetic properties.

Representative publications from Wriedt Laboratory: